National Interagency Fire Center News

Air Quality Plummets as Wildfire Smoke Hits Alaska’s Most Populous Cities

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Smoke and soot from central Alaska wildfires have afflicted the subarctic city of Fairbanks with some of the world’s worst air pollution in recent days, forcing many residents indoors and prompting one hospital to set up a …

Wildfire Risk Rises as Temperature Increases

As temperatures rise in the U.S. West, so do the flames. The years with the most acres burned by wildfires have some of the hottest temperatures, an Associated Press analysis of fire and weather data found. As human-caused climate change …

Decades Old Fire Lookouts Remain Crucial in Spotting Wildfires

Fire-lookout towers perched atop remote, craggy peaks across the U.S. West may seem like quaint reminders of an era before satellites, smartphones and jet-propelled air tankers. Indeed, some of the structures are more than 100 years old. But with their …

Money Runs Low as Wildfires Continue to Torch Montana

Montana’s worst fire season in years is expected to scorch the drought-stricken landscape well into fall, long after the state’s firefighting reserves run out thanks to politicians diverting millions of dollars to fill a budget shortfall. There is only $12 …

Above Average Wildfire Risk Expected for Southwest, Florida

Wildfires this summer are expected to be most severe in southwestern U.S. states, Florida, Georgia and in some parts of California and Nevada, forecasters said Monday. The summer 2017 fire outlook issued by the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise …

Oregon Firefighter Dies on Break During Wildfire Fight

An Oregon firefighter died in a fall while on a break from battling a wildfire in the southern Cascade Range, officials said. Matthew David Goodnature, 21, of Phoenix, Oregon, was dead when another firefighter found him Tuesday evening near Four …

National Wildfire Teams Getting Harder to Fill

Officials with the National Interagency Fire Center are studying ways to boost recruitment for the teams that manage wildfires and other disasters. Agency spokesman Don Smurthwaite told the Lewiston Tribune that participation in the incident management teams is declining because …